Adventure interpreter

Pirate Adventure Start

In 1980 I started playing games on my TRS-80 computer and my favorite games were adventure games and especially the adventure games from Adventure International. During that time I also wrote my own adventure game in basic based on an article by Scott Adams (the man behind Adventure International) (www.msadams.com) about his adventure interpreter. Years later I came into contact with Scott and a friendship developed and even now I still have regular contact with my American friend. In 1997 I adapted the scottfree version of the adventure interpreter and I improved it and added missing features. I wrote a windowed version for Microsoft Windows (Visual C) and this version is released on a CD with a large collection of old Adventure games in America. In 2005 I made a new version and in 2013 I also made a new improved version with a new user interface. Now it is 2023 and I have written some emulators and for the adventure games I went back to basic. No more MS Windows multiple windows, but just an old terminal screen just like the way it used to work in 1980. Version 4.0.1 of my adventure interpreter is back to the basic. Sometimes it is nice to get a taste of the very old atmosphere of the old text adventure games.

Download Scott Adams adventure interpreter 4.0.1.

Download link:   AdvInt401.zip

*) The zip file contains a x64 and x32 version of the program and all the Scott Adams game file and some extra game file from other authors.

This program is a so called portable program, you do not need to install it. Just download the zip file and extract it in a directory on your disk. I have all my portable programs in a root directory “portapps”. There is a x64 and x32 executable, both files are digitally signed with a coding certficate for your safety and to be trusted by Windows defender and virusscanners. If you find as bug or have a remark, I like to receive feedback to improve this program.

Version 4.0.1

  • In this version the user interface has completely changed to a terminal emulation like the old personal computer screens.
  • There is no Spanish translation in this new version, the old Spanish version is still available.
  • I renamed all the adventure dat files and added some more from my archive.
  • There is no longer a dropdonw of the verbs and nouns, but there is a Hint command in the top menu that will show them.

I hope you will enjoy playing this old games, just like the old times. Regards, Hein Pragt

Older versions

I deleted some things in the new version, there is no Spanish version anymore, there is no dropdown of verbs and nouns, but there is a hint command in the top menu that will show all verbs and nouns. For people who like the old interface I still have the older versions on this page as well.

Download Scott Adams adventure interpreter 3.0.6.

Download link: AdvInt306.zip

  • In this version 3.0.6 the game flags are reset when loading a game, and the typed command is put into the message window. Also there is a English and a Spanish version in the zip file.
  • In version (3.0.4) 2018 you can stretch the main window to make the inventory field wider.
  • In version (3.0.3) 2014 I fixed a bug in loading a saved game and a bug that prevented one action to be executed.
  • The previous version (3.0.2) 2013 was the Windows XP verdion. The current versdion works fine on Windows 10.

With this interpreter program you can play the old text adventures of Scott Adams (Adventure International) on your Windows PC. Fourteen original adventure games are included in the same zip file.

The latest version has a greatly improved (English) user interface, buttons for the most used commands, a separate inventory window and dropdown lists with all commands and objects. This makes it easier to play as sometimes the old games were more “guess the right words”. This version of the program makes it easier to play these old adventure games with a modern user interface. I made this version “just for fun” because sometimes programmers just have to make something fun without any commercial interest just because “it’s fun!”. I hope you will also enjoy this program and the old adventure games.
Regards, {-Hein Pragt}

Download Scott Adams game interpreter older versions.

Link: advent201.zip
This ia an older version (2.01) 2005 of the windows95 / 98 / NT / 2000 / XP version of the Scott Adams adventure interpreter.

Link: advent105.zip
This is a very old version (1.05) 1997 of the windows95 / 98 / NT / 2000 / XP version of the Scott Adams adventure interpreter.

Scott Adams adventure games dat files.

Link: advents.zip
This zip file contains all data files from Scott Adams’ text adventure games, you can also visit Scott’s homepage Adams himself (www.msadams.com) where you can also play more recent adventure games.

Games in this zip file:

  • #1 Adventureland (1978)
  • #2 Pirate’s Adventure
  • #3 Mission Impossible (1979)
  • #5 The Count (1981)
  • #6 Strange Odyssey
  • #7 Mystery Fun House
  • #8 Pyramid of Doom
  • #9 Ghost Town
  • #10 Savage Island, part 1
  • #11 Savage Island, part 2
  • #13 Sorcerer of Claymorgue Castle (1984)
  • #14 Return to Pirate’s Island

About Scott Adams.

Scott Adams wrote the first commercial text adventure game for the personal computer. He wrote Adventureland fot the TRS-80 computer in BASIC. Scott based his play on Colossal Caves, written by Will Crowther and Don Woods on one DEC PDP-10. Scott Adams started a company called Adventure International in 1978 and between 1978 and 1984 he wrote fourteen text adventure games for the TRS-80, Atari, Apple II, C64, Sorcerer, TI and CP / M computers. All games used the same two word command parsers with which the games could play the game. GO EAST, GET SNEAKERS and SAY YOHO were well-known commands.

Scott Adams started selling the Adventureland game by placing a small ad in a computer magazine and turning on the game sell cassette tapes. One of his first sales was fifty copies to the then well-known Radio Shack company in Chicago. In December 1980, Byte magazine wrote an article about Scott Adams’ adventure games and its peak period Adventure International company had a turnover of 3 million dollars. They also signed a major contract with Marvel Comics all known action figures to release an adventure game.

But when the first dip came in the video games market in the mid-80s, Adventure International unfortunately went bankrupt and all licences of the games went to the bank that held them for years. At the end of the last century, Scott got the rights to his old games back and made them freely available to play. He did retain the copyright on these games. Scott Adams now lives in Wisconsin and has worked for years as a senior programmer for Avista Inc. He is now retired, enjoying life and still working on computer games.

Text adventures.

The origins of the text adventure genre began in 1976 with the game “Colossal Cave Adventure”. This game was created by the American programmer and amateur caver William Crowther. In this game, the player has to explore a huge subterranean labyrinth, search for hidden treasures and fight with dwarves and dragons. All this was just represented by text on the screen with a description of the environment and the objects at that location. The game was controlled by two word commands such as “go east”, “get ax” and “open door”. In the great labyrinth of Adventure you can quickly get lost, you have to defeat dragons and a dwarf throws an ax at you, your treasures are regularly stolen by a pirate who then hides them elsewhere and where you have to use magic to get where you want.

Due to their simplicity, the text adventures became the first commercial games for home computers. Legendary Developers of text adventures are Scott Adams and the company Infocom founded in 1979 by students at MIT with titles like “Zork”, “Planetfall” and “Deadline”. Unfortunately, in the 80s, the text adventure fell victim to the increasing processing capacity of computers and graphics games made their appearance. Text adventures were replaced with graphics adventures as well and they were called point and click adventures. Well-known developers of these adventure games were Sierra On-Line with the famous Roberta Williams as the creator of beautiful adventures such as King Quest and Space Quest series and Leisure Suit Larry. But there was also Lucasarts with Maniac Mansion, Monkey Island and Indiana Jones who are exceptional due to their graphic design, sound and humor. In the mid-90s, the genre changed slightly again with adventure games full of puzzles such as The Seventh Guest and the legendary Myst and Riven.

But even nowadays people are still interested in text adventures because it can be played as a kind of interactive book. The player must form his own image of the world in the adventure himself and must be very creative in order to use the right path and find your way through the adventure with the right objects. Some experience with the genre of game will help, if you know that you have to pick things up and drop them again, a “locked door” requires a “key” that you can probably find somewhere else you can play the games faster and enjoy them more. New text adventures are still being created by a small group of people but there are also people that are interested in the old games. This is also because these games often excel in one good story and smart puzzles while modern games are often better graphically but less good in a good story.

Walkthrough Scott Adams Pirate Adventure.

There are two “treasures” in Pirate Adventure:

  1. Gold Dubleons
  2. Rare Stamps
Flat in LondonGET CRACKERS, GET SNEAKERS, GET RUM, GO STAIRS
AlcoveGET BOOK (“There’s a strange sound”), GO PASSAGE
Secret PassagewayGO EAST
Musty atticGET TORCH, GET DUFFEL, EXAMINE DUFFEL, OPEN DUFFEL, DROP DUFFEL, GET MATCHES, GO WEST
Secret PassagewayGO WEST
AlcoveREAD BOOK, GO WINDOW
Outside open window on ledgeSAY YOHO
Sandy beachDROP SNEAKERS, DROP BOOK, GO EAST
MeadowGO SHACK, GIVE RUM, WAIT (for Pirate to take rum), GO WEST, GO EAST
Foot of a caveGO PATH
Top of a hillGO CRACK
Dark locationLIGHT TORCH
Large cavernGO SHED
Tool shedGET HAMMER, GET WINGS, GO NORTH, GO CRACK
Top of a hillUNLIGHT TORCH, GO DOWN, GO WEST, GO WEST
Sandy beachDROP WINGS, DROP TORCH, DROP MATCHES, DROP SACK, GET BOOK, GET SNEAKERS, SAY YOHO
Outside open window on ledgeGO WINDOW
AlcoveGO PASSAGE
Secret passagewayGO EAST
Musty atticGET BOTTLE, GO WEST, GO WEST, GO DOWN
Flat in LondonGET NAILS (The rug is nailed down!), GET RUG, DROP RUG, GET KEYS, GO STAIRS
AlcoveGO WINDOW
Outside open window on ledgeSAY YOHO
Sandy beachDROP BOOK, DROP HAMMER, DROP SNEAKERS, DROP NAILS, GET WINGS, GO LAGOON
Shallow lagoonWAIT (For tide to come in), GO NORTH
OceanGET WATER, GET FISH, GO SOUTH
Shallow lagoonGO SOUTH
Sandy beachDROP WINGS, GET TORCH, GET MATCHES, GO EAST
MeadowGO EAST
Foot of a caveLIGHT TORCH, GO CAVE
Maze of cavesGO DOWN
PitTHROW FISH, DROP BOTTLE, UNLOCK DOOR, GO HALL
Long hallwayGO EAST
Large cavernGO SHED
Tool shedGET SHOVEL, GO NORTH
Large cavernGET LUMBER, GET SAILS, GO WEST
Long hallwayGO PIT
PitGO UP
Maze of cavesGO WEST
Foot of a caveUNLIGHT TORCH, GO WEST
MeadowGO WEST
Sandy beachDROP LUMBER, DROP SAILS, DROP TORCH, DROP MATCHES, GET SACK, GO EAST, GO SHACK
Grass shackUNLOCK CHEST, LOOK CHEST, GET PLANS, LOOK CHEST, GET MAP, GET PARROT, GO WEST, GO WEST
Sandy beachDROP KEYS, WAIT (For the tides to change)
Shallow lagoonGO LAGOON, DIG ANCHOR, GET ANCHOR, GO SOUTH
Sandy beachDROP ANCHOR, BUILD SHIP, DROP PLANS, GET SNEAKERS, GET BOOK, SAY YOHO
Outside open window on ledgeGO WINDOW, GO PASSAGE, GO EAST
Musty atticWAKE PIRATE, GO WEST, GO WEST, GO WINDOW, SAY YOHO
Sandy beachDROP BOOK, DROP SNEAKERS, GO SHIP
Aboard pirate shipSET SAIL (You may need to WAIT for the tide to come in!), GO BEACH
*Treasure* IslandDIG, WAIT (Pirate grabs rum), GO SOUTH
Spooky graveyardGO EAST
Large barren fieldPACE 30, DIG, GET BOX, DROP SHOVEL, GO MONASTERY
Deserted monasteryDROP PARROT, GET DUBLEONS, GO WEST, GO WEST
Spooky graveyardWAKE PIRATE, GO NORTH
*Treasure* IslandGO SHIP
Aboard pirate shipSET SAIL, GO BEACH
Sandy beachGET HAMMER, OPEN BOX, GET STAMPS, DROP HAMMER, DROP BOX, GET BOOK, GET SNEAKERS, SAY YOHO
Outside open window on ledgeGO WINDOW, GO DOWN
Flat in LondonDROP DUBLEONS, DROP STAMPS, SCORE

More pages on game development

Comments

  1. julian
    julian

    Thank you for providing your interpreter and the Scott Adams game files. I like the period interface. Unlike you – if I understood your background – I never got into Windows software development, but remained firmly embedded. Though I have done a bit of Java and Javascript in recent years. I first played Adams’ adventures (1-5) in 1979, on an Exidy Sorcerer, our family’s first home computer. In 2015 I wrote a custom adventure game in C. I made this available in Android, by interfacing it with the Java Android Developer front end as a native library – the i/o was a serial stream which worked fine. I had two reviews – one disliked it, too young to know what Adventures are (it’s not a shoot ’em up, innit); and the other, a Japanese, loved it, he too didn’t know what Adventures are, but I think he liked the imagination these games instill. Anyway, thank you again.

  2. Harold Robinson
    Harold Robinson

    I am completely new to Text Adventures but they look like fun and I thank you for your efforts. I have downloaded your latest advent401.zip and unzipped it into a folder called scott, but I don’t know what to do next to get started. Could you please, please give a short explanation or an example? It’s probably really simple but I just can’t figure it out. Thanks.

    1. admin Post
      Author
      admin

      Hello Harrold, it is indeed not that hard, just start the Advint4.exe program and load one of the adventure games.
      Kind regards,
      Hein Pragt

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